Wyoming: She’ll leave you high and dry.

Rock Springs, the town I live in in Wyoming, is located at 6338 feet.  Higher than a mile, and the highest elevation I have ever resided at (other than summer camp in the Sierra’s). The elevation here, is deceiving though. It’s a high plains desert, and doesn’t feel like places you associate with high elevation, like the mountains.

I live in that green section that you see, with that “mountain” view out my bedroom window. This is only half the town, but it gives you an idea of the topography. Brown. Good thing I was born and raised in the high mountain desert, or this might be quite the shock for me.

Last week I was in Reno for my baby shower, thrown by my mother, and a family friend came up to me and told me to make sure I was drinking enough water. I thought she was just giving me advice, because I am pregnant and people are compelled to give you advice and ask you how your are feeling every second of every day. But then she started talking about elevation changes. She is a Labor and Delivery nurse, and said she sees with some amount of frequency, people who come to Reno/Tahoe for a final vacation before the baby comes and end up in early labor due to the elevation and lack of hydration. I wasn’t too worried about myself, having previously been living at an elevation of 2,516ft and Reno is located at 4,505, and I was only there for a few days, but it did get me thinking about the jump to almost 6400 feet.

Hydration is crucial all the time, not just in pregnancy, and I’m sure the hospital here in Rock Springs sees plenty of dehydration cases in visitors and newcomers. But, it’s even more crucial in pregnancy, and at 30 weeks, I really don’t want to go into labor just yet.

I was talking to my best friend about elevation and exercise on the phone, the day after I arrived here in Wyoming. She is currently in Afghanistan and training for a half marathon in Scotland. She said, after the 3000 feet in Afghanistan, that her race in Scotland should be pretty easy. I mentioned the elevation here, and how that combined with my increased blood volume, and extra weight strapped around my stomach, working out felt hard and that these days even a 20-30 minute walk was enough exercise for me.

Four days later this showed up on my doorstep…

 

A Camelbak hydration pack! Inside the pack was a note from my friend about staying hydrated etc. A perfect “welcome to wyoming” gift. I am sort of a gear-nerd, so I was excited to see the padded straps, sternum strap, and all the pockets in which I could carry my keys and phone etc. I have been holding a 24 ounce water bottle in my hand during my walks, and this is going to make it so much easier, have you ever tried holding a nalgene with thick winter gloves on? Not so easy.

I’m excited to get out for my walk with the dog this morning, in fact, that is what I am off too next. It is a balmy 18 degrees outside, but no wind! Gotta take advantage of the still air while I can.

 

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What is Wyoming?-Leaving Home

This past week, I have been having this strange sort of feeling about leaving Idaho. I couldn’t quite put my finger on that feeling though. It wasn’t sad, scared, or nervous.  Today I finally figured it out, it feels like I am leaving home.

I left home the first time in 2001, to go to college. I grew up in Reno, Nevada and went to school at the University of Idaho, in Moscow Idaho. I knew no one, other than my grandfather who lived in Moscow. But we weren’t close. I was terrified and incredibly excited.

I have lived in Idaho now for almost 10 and a half years. In those years, it has become home. While I have lived in two different parts of the state, the whole place feels like home to me now.

I think part of that has to do with the fact that those 10 years have been incredibly formative. In that time I have:

Gone away to college, made life-long friends, felt my first heartache, had friends die, had family members die, loved in capacities that I didn’t even know was possible,  lived in a dorm, lived in an apartment, lived alone, gone on road trips with friends, had summer jobs all over the country, graduated from college, been engaged, gotten married, moved in with my husband, searched for jobs, worked at my first job, made a whole new slew of life-long friends, watched my friends get married, have babies, and get divorced, bought a house, bought a car, become a landlord, become an aunt, become pregnant, and moved in with my in-laws.

It’s alot of living that happens between 18 and 28. And honestly, there are only a few moments of it I would change.

But, now it’s time to move forward, to look forward to the incredible life changes that will come in the next 10 years.

This move to Wyoming, sort of fits. New state, new baby, new work situation.  Again, all new, just like the last time I left home. And I’m ready.

Hiring…myself?

For the past few days, I have been interviewing people for my job. I have to tell you, it’s  a trip.

We have about 125 applicants. When I applied for this job, I think there were 5 applicants.  Quite the difference, sign of the times right?

Before I knew I was leaving this job, I had plenty of days when I wished that I was. We all have those days at work right? Where you just don’t want to do your job anymore? I mean, for me, it’s few and far between, but they do exist. But, now that it’s a reality it’s sort of freaking me out a little bit.

I want, more than anything, to live with my husband again, but leaving my job makes me panic a little bit, and i’m starting to get a little bit emotional about it. I have a fantastic job, great co-workers, and an amazing boss. When I interview these candidates, I go through a strange succession of emotions.  Doubt, disbelief, feeling like this is MY job, and you don’t get to have it!

I sort of feel like I am leaving my baby with a baby sitter. The plan is to have the new person hired before my last day, so  can train them. I can already feel myself starting to want to micromanage the person to death. To tell them everything that I do and how I do it.

I think this is all part of making the transition to my new life. Even though my husband is already gone, not that much has changed for me, aside from that one gigantic factor. It’s all part of learning to let go, and move on. Right?

What is Wyoming?-State Nickname

You really can learn something new!

Yesterday, I was getting a quarter out of my wallet for a rare trip to the vending machine, I had a sudden craving for skittles. I try to avoid giving into my crazy, random sugar cravings, but yesterday it couldn’t be helped. One of the quarters I pulled out, was a Wyoming quarter. I noticed the words “The Equality State” on the quarter. As I walked to the vending machine, for my sugar hit, I realized I had NO idea  why Wyoming was called by that particular moniker, and really not much about Wyoming at all.

When I got back to my desk, I did what any thinking person would do, I googled. I was amazed at what I learned.

Wyoming was the FIRST state to allow women to; vote, sit on juries, and hold public office. I had NO idea. I tried to remember if I had ever learned this in school, and maybe I had, but I couldn’t come up with anything, from the recesses of my brain. If this were a jeopardy question, ” state that first allowed women to vote.” I would have come up with something like “What is Maryland?”

I have to admit, I’m quite impressed Wyoming. I mis-judged you. I truly had no idea, and I’m totally going to look more into this, and into Wyoming history.